Heart Attack and Cardiac Arrest

How to Save Yourself from Heart Attack?

Last updated on January 5th, 2023 at 03:49 pm

Saving yourself from a heart attack can be a matter of life and death. A heart attack, also known as a myocardial infarction, occurs when the blood supply to the heart is blocked, usually by a clot in one of the coronary arteries. This can lead to damage or death of the heart muscle.

Save Yourself From Heart Attack With 5 Valuable Steps

While heart attacks can be unpredictable and sometimes unavoidable, there are steps you can take to reduce your risk and potentially save yourself from experiencing one. Here are some tips on how to do so:

Know your risk factors

There are certain factors that can increase your risk of having a heart attack, including:

  • Age: Your risk of having a heart attack increases as you get older, especially after age 45 for men and after age 55 for women.
  • Family history: If you have a family history of heart disease, you may be at an increased risk of having a heart attack.
  • High blood pressure: High blood pressure, or hypertension, puts extra strain on your heart and blood vessels, increasing your risk of heart attack.
  • High cholesterol: High levels of cholesterol in your blood can build up in your arteries, increasing your risk of heart attack.
  • Smoking: Smoking damages your heart and blood vessels, increasing your risk of heart attack.
  • Diabetes: People with diabetes have an increased risk of heart attack due to their high blood sugar levels, which can damage blood vessels and the heart.
  • Obesity: Being obese or overweight can increase your risk of heart attack, as it puts extra strain on your heart and can lead to other risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol.
  • Sedentary lifestyle: Lack of physical activity can increase your risk of heart attack, as it can lead to other risk factors such as obesity and high blood pressure.

Make lifestyle changes

Making healthy lifestyle changes can help reduce your risk of heart attack. Some changes to consider include:

  • Eating a healthy diet: A diet that is high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein can help lower your risk of heart attack. Avoid processed foods, sugary drinks, and foods high in saturated and trans fats.
  • Exercising regularly: Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise per week. Regular physical activity can help lower your risk of heart attack by improving your heart health and reducing other risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol.
  • Quitting smoking: If you smoke, quitting is one of the best things you can do to reduce your risk of heart attack. Smoking damages your heart and blood vessels, so quitting can help reverse this damage and lower your risk.
  • Managing stress: Chronic stress can contribute to heart disease, so finding ways to manage stress can help reduce your risk of heart attack. This can include activities such as exercise, meditation, and talking to a therapist.

Take medications as prescribed

If you have been prescribed medications to manage a risk factor for heart attack, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol, it is important to take them as directed. Missing doses or not taking your medications as prescribed can increase your risk of heart attack. If you are having trouble remembering to take your medications, ask your healthcare provider for strategies to help you stay on track.

Know the signs of a heart attack

One of the most important things you can do to protect yourself from a heart attack is to be aware of the signs and symptoms. These can include:

  • Chest pain or discomfort: This is often described as a feeling of tightness, pressure, or squeezing in the chest. The pain may be mild or severe, and it may come and go or be constant.
  • Discomfort in other areas of the body: Some people experience pain or discomfort in their arms, back, neck, jaw, or stomach during a heart attack.
  • Shortness of breath: Difficulty breathing, or feeling like you can’t catch your breath, can be a sign of a heart attack.
  • Nausea: Some people may feel nauseous or sick to their stomach during a heart attack.
  • Lightheadedness: Feeling dizzy or light-headed can also be a sign of a heart attack.
  • Sweating: Breaking out in a cold sweat for no apparent reason can be a sign of a heart attack.

If you experience any of these symptoms, it’s important to seek medical attention right away. Don’t wait to see if the symptoms go away on their own, as this could be dangerous.

Know your numbers

There are several key numbers that can help you understand your risk of a heart attack and what you can do to reduce it. These include:

  • Blood pressure: High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a major risk factor for heart attacks. Keeping your blood pressure in check is important, as high blood pressure can damage the arteries and increase your risk of heart disease.
  • Cholesterol levels: High levels of “bad” LDL cholesterol can build up in the arteries, increasing your risk of a heart attack. On the other hand, “good” HDL cholesterol can help protect against heart disease.
  • Body mass index (BMI): Your BMI is a measure of your body fat based on your height and weight. A BMI of 25 or higher is need to reduced and controlled.
Conclusion

Heart attacks are a serious health issue that can have devastating consequences if not treated promptly. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), heart disease is the leading cause of death globally, responsible for 17.9 million deaths each year. While some people may be more at risk of having a heart attack due to genetics or certain medical conditions, there are steps that everyone can take to reduce their risk. Learn how to manage between your body and mind?

All material copyright healthcare nt sickcare. Terms and conditions and Privacy Policy of use. The contents are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: various online articles and our own offline experiences inspired this article. The content is meant for public awareness and regular posts to the clientele of healthcare nt sickcare.

© healthcare nt sickcare and healthcarentsickcare.com, 2017-Till Date. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full credit is given to healthcare nt sickcare and healthcarentsickcare.com with appropriate and specific directions for the original content.

Credit VivekNNair by vismithams.in

About healthcare nt sickcare

healthcare nt sickcare connects the major health ecosystem, patients, doctors, diagnostics, and other partners, to generate exceptional value and service for all, esp. The end-receivers (patients). We integrate different parts of the healthcare journey and put them together end-to-end on our platform so that patients can have one seamless healthcare experience, irrespective of their needs.

Item added to cart.
0 items - 0.00