Pathology Laboratory

24 hour Urine Test

24 hour urine test

The 24 hour urine test (protein) checks how much protein is being spilt into the urine, which can help detect disease or other problems. The test is simple and noninvasive.

24 hour urine protein test

Urine samples are collected in one or more containers for over 24 hours. The containers are kept in a cool environment and then sent to a lab for analysis. The technician then checks the urine for protein.

When higher-than-normal amounts of protein are in the urine, it’s called proteinuria. This is often a sign of kidney damage and disease.

The test doesn’t show what kinds of protein are in the urine. To determine this, your doctor may also order tests such as a serum and urine protein electrophoresis. The test also doesn’t show the cause of protein loss.

Occasionally, proteinuria isn’t a sign of kidney damage. This is especially true for children. Protein levels may be higher during the day than the night. Other factors, such as extreme exercise, may also influence the test results.

What is the purpose of 24 hour urine protein test?

A 24 hour urine protein test is given if you have symptoms of glomerulonephritis or nephrotic syndrome. Other types of kidney disease or other conditions that affect the kidneys are also sufficient reasons to order the test, including:

  • uncontrolled diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • lupus
  • preeclampsia screening during pregnancy

The 24 hour urine protein test comprises multiple samples of urine taken over a 24-hour period. It’s different from a protein-to-creatinine ratio test, which uses just one sample of urine. The 24 hour urine protein test may be given as a follow-up to a positive protein-to-creatinine ratio test.

Protein in the urine may signify kidney damage or disease. Protein levels may also rise temporarily because of factors such as infection, stress, or excessive exercise.

If the protein is caused by kidney damage, the test results will help to determine the extent of that damage. The protein amount can also monitor any disease progression or measure your response to therapy.

Proteinuria is associated with many other conditions. These include:

  • amyloidosis, an abnormal presence of amyloid proteins in organs and tissues
  • bladder cancer tumours
  • congestive heart failure
  • diabetes
  • urinary tract infection
  • use of medications that damage the kidneys
  • Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia, a rare plasma cell cancer
  • glomerulonephritis, inflammation of the blood vessels in the kidneys
  • Goodpasture syndrome, a rare autoimmune disease
  • heavy metal poisoning
  • hypertension
  • kidney infection
  • multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells
  • lupus, an inflammatory autoimmune disease
  • polycystic kidney disease

Your doctor may ask for more tests to make a diagnosis.

24 hour urine test preparation

Before the test, your doctor may ask:

  • Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or think you may be pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor about any supplements or prescription and over-the-counter medications you’re taking. Some supplements and drugs can interfere with the test results. Your doctor can tell you which ones to avoid.
  • Avoid certain foods or beverages if advised by your doctor.
  • Ask your doctor if you need to begin the test at a particular time of day.
  • Make sure you understand when you should return the container of urine to your laboratory.
24 hour urine test normal values
UnisexAll age groups< 80 mg/day

You may also interest in reading: Urinary Tract Infection

Protein in urine during pregnancy

Many doctors will check your urine at every visit by dipping a chemical strip into your sample to give them an instant sign of whether there is a protein in your urine. Other doctors will check your urine less frequently at the beginning of your pregnancy and monitor it more closely toward the end.

Low levels of protein in your urine are normal (source). It’s when the amount of protein in your urine rises above a certain threshold that your doctor may become concerned. Read More.

Introduction to the Pathology Laboratory

24 hour urine creatinine test

Creatinine is a chemical waste product produced by muscle metabolism. When your kidneys are functioning normally, they filter creatinine and other waste products out of your blood. These waste products are removed from your body through urination.

A creatinine urine test measures the amount of creatinine in your urine. The test can help your doctor evaluate how well your kidneys are functioning. This is useful for diagnosing or ruling out kidney disease and other conditions affecting the kidneys.

Your laboratory uses a random urine sample to test for creatinine. However, they’ll order a urine 24-hour volume test in most cases. Although one sample of urine can be tested for creatinine, it’s more accurate to collect the urine for a whole day to get that value. The creatinine in your urine can vary a lot based on diet, exercise, and hydration levels, so a spot check is not as helpful. As the name suggests, this creatinine urine test measures the amount of urine produced in a day. It isn’t a painful test, and there aren’t any risks associated with it.

Normal urine creatinine values range from 955 to 2,936 milligrams (mg) per 24 hours for males, and 601 to 1,689 mg per 24 hours for females. Creatinine values that fall outside the normal range may show:

  • kidney disease
  • kidney infection
  • kidney failure
  • urinary tract obstruction, such as kidney stones
  • late-stage muscular dystrophy
  • myasthenia gravis

Abnormal values can also occur in people who have diabetes or a diet that’s high in meat or other proteins.

Depending on your results, your doctor may refer to a serum creatinine test. This is a type of blood test that measures the amount of creatinine in your blood. Your doctor may use it to help confirm a diagnosis.

24 hour urine creatinine test preparation

Before the test, your doctor may ask:

  • Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or think you may be pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor about any supplements or prescription and over-the-counter medications you’re taking. Some supplements and drugs can interfere with the test results. Your doctor can tell you which ones to avoid.
  • Avoid certain foods or beverages if advised by your doctor.
  • Ask your doctor if you need to begin the test at a particular time of day.
  • Make sure you understand when you should return the container of urine to your laboratory.

DIABETES – TYPES, SYMPTOMS, TREATMENT, TESTS

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